257 West Union St.
Athens, Ohio 45701
Ph: 740-593-3150
Gorman-Redlich Manufacturing Co.

Frequently Asked Questions

Common Alerting Protocol (CAP)
Q: I keep hearing about the Common Alerting Protocol (CAP). What is it?
Q: Do I have to implement CAP?
Q: Can Gorman-Redlich help me stay compliant with CAP?
Q: Is Gorman-Redlich CAP equipment certified?
Q: Is the Gorman-Redlich CAP-DEC1 a stand-alone unit?
Q: With which equipment is Gorman-Redlich CAP equipment compatible?

GR Equipment and Company Information
Q: Is Gorman-Redlich equipment FCC certified for use in broadcasting environments?
Q: What is the FCC ID of the Gorman-Redlich equipment?
Q: Where can I find a complete list of Gorman-Redlich products?
Q: Where can I purchase Gorman-Redlich equipment?
Q: How much does Gorman-Redlich equipment cost?
Q: Which methods of payment do you accept?
Q: How can I see Gorman-Redlich equipment in person?
Q: How can I get in touch with Gorman-Redlich Manufacturing Company?
Q: Can I hear test audio samples?
Q: How can I stay up to date with the latest Gorman-Redlich news?

Equipment Use and Troubleshooting
Q: There are two dark bars across my unit's display screen. What is wrong with it?
Q: I received my Gorman-Redlich EAS-1 unit. What do I do now?
Q: How can I change the settings in my EAS-1 unit?
Q: Which EAS units are compatible with the Windows EASSetup software?
Q: I have downloaded the EASSetup software but I can't extract the files. Why not?
Q: How can I keep EAS logs on my computer or CAP-DEC and avoid using a printer?
Q: How can I make sure that I have the latest CAP-DEC software?
Q: How do I configure my Gorman-Redlich alerting equipment?
Q: My CAP-DEC says "A Win32 command line email tool has stopped working."
Q: Emails from my CAP-DEC aren't being delivered.
Q: How do I configure my CAP-DEC to work with my proxy server?
Q: What steps to I need to take to secure my equipment from "Zombie Invasion" messages or other unauthorized uses?



Don't see your question here? Contact us!

Q: I keep hearing about the Common Alerting Protocol(CAP). What is it?
A: CAP is an XML-based data format for exchanging public warnings and emergencies between alerting technologies which allows a warning message to be consistently disseminated simultaneously over many warning systems to many applications. CAP increases warning effectiveness and simplifies the task of activating a warning for responsible officials.
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Q: Do I have to implement CAP?
A: If you are an EAS participant, yes. In May 2007, the FCC mandated that all EAS participants be able to receive alerts in CAP format within 180 days of the September 30, 2010, CAP adoption by FEMA. That deadline has been extended to 1 year from the adoption date.
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Q: Can Gorman-Redlich help me stay compliant with CAP?
A: Yes! Gorman-Redlich will initially be offering a standalone CAP-to-EAS Decoder system for use with existing EAS units. In the future, we plan to offer an integrated system that combines CAP-to-EAS conversion and EAS encoder/decoder capabilities.
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Q: Is Gorman-Redlich CAP equipment certified?
A: There is no certification process for Common Alerting Protocol equipment apart from FCC Part 11 certification. There does exist, however, a FEMA IPAWS Conformity Assessment Program (ICAP). The Gorman-Redlich CAP-DEC1 CAP-to-EAS decoder has undergone and passed the ICAP testing procedures and is listed in the FEMA Responder Knowledge Base (RKB) along with its Supplier's Declaration of Conformity (SDoC).

The Gorman-Redlich CAP-DEC 1 is also FCC Part 11 certified with an FCC ID of MVZCAP-DEC1.
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Q: Is the Gorman-Redlich CAP-DEC1 a stand-alone unit?
A: The Gorman-Redlich CAP-DEC1 CAP-to-EAS decoder is classified as an "intermediary device" and must be used in conjunction with certified EAS equipment such as the Gorman-Redlich EAS1 product line. For more information, please see the Understanding CAP Converters article
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Q: With which equipment is Gorman-Redlich CAP equipment compatible?
A: The Gorman-Redlich CAP-DEC1 CAP-to-EAS decoder has two modes of operation:

The RS232 mode of operation is compatible with the Gorman-Redlich EAS1 line of EAS encoder-decoders and allows more rapid transmission of alerts between the CAP-DEC1 and the EAS unit, along with more detailed information.

In the AFSK mode of operation, the CAP-DEC1 emits bursts of SAME encoded AFSK data tones. These data tones may be input into any certified EAS encoder-decoder that is capable of consuming FSK data tones.
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Q: Is Gorman-Redlich equipment FCC certified for use in broadcasting environments?
A: Yes. Gorman-Redlich is one of ten FCC certified vendors of EAS encoder/decoder units and one of only four FCC certified vendors of EAS decoder only units.
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Q: What is the FCC ID of the Gorman-Redlich equipment?
A: Both the EAS-1 encoder/decoder units and the EAS-1 decoder only units have an FCC ID of MVZEAS1. CAP-DEC 1 units have an FCC ID of MVZCAP-DEC1.
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Q: Where can I find a complete list of Gorman-Redlich products?
A: Our product page shows the full line of Gorman-Redlich offerings.
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Q: Where can I purchase Gorman-Redlich equipment?
A: You can purchase directly through us or through one of our numerous online vendors. Contact us for details.
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Q: How much does Gorman-Redlich equipment cost?
A: Current prices are available on the product pricelist.
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Q: Which methods of payment do you accept?
A: We accept payment by check, money order, PayPal and major credit cards.
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Q: How can I see Gorman-Redlich equipment in person?
A: We generally have representatives at major industry trade shows and conferences. Visit our shows page to see where we will be next.
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Q: How can I get in touch with Gorman-Redlich Manufacturing Company?
A: Our contact information is on the contact page.
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Q: Can I hear test audio samples?
A: Yes. Test audio samples are available in MP3 format on the download page.
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Q: How can I stay up to date with the latest Gorman-Redlich news?
A: Sign up for the Gorman Redlich Update to receive periodical emails with the latest company news, upcoming shows and demonstrations and more.
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Q: There are two dark bars across my unit's display screen. What is wrong with it?
A: In most cases this is caused by a damaged power supply. Contact us for support.
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Q: I received my Gorman-Redlich EAS-1 unit. What do I do now?
A: Plug it in! If you purchased your Gorman-Redlich unit directly from us and filled out the programming form it will already be programmed with your station's information in it. If changes need to be made to your unit's settings, you may either download the EASSetup software or use the front panel keypad. See the EAS-1 instruction sheet and manual for more information.
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Q: How can I change the settings in my EAS-1 unit?
A: Most settings may be entered/changed via the front panel keypad. For details, see the EAS-1 manual. Settings may also be changed via the EASSetup software. For details, see software documentation.
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Q: Which EAS units are compatible with the Windows EASSetup software?
A: EAS-1 units with firmware version 9.2 and above are compatible with the Windows setup software. Most firmware versions prior to 9.2 are compatible with the DOS setup software. Revision C boards will likely require hardware modification. Please contact us for details.
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Q: I have downloaded the EASSetup software but I can't extract the files. Why not?
A: The setup software is in password-protected zip files intended for use by current customers only. Contact us for details.
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Q: How can I keep EAS logs on my computer or CAP-DEC and avoid using a printer?
A: Dan Bissett has created a freeware utility called EAS Monitor that achieves this functionality. The Microsoft Windows-compatible software is free to download and use. See this document for details on downloading, setting up and using EAS Monitor. See this sample configuration file for example default/recommended values.

Note that this sample configuration file will create weekly log directories directly on the computer's C drive. To store the logs elsewhere you must create a directory (on the desktop, for instance) and copy the file path to that directory in the "file_path" element within the configuration file.
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Q: How can I make sure that I have the latest CAP-DEC software?
A: First, make sure that you have signed up for the CAP Software Update Mailing List to receive notifications when new software is released. If you need a software update, use the form on this page to request the latest software update.
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Q: How do I configure my Gorman-Redlich alerting equipment?
A: Gorman-Redlich EAS and Weather Radio equipment is configured using GR Setup software that is available on the downloads page. Note that there are two versions of the setup software: a DOS-based software for units with firmware v9.1 and earlier and a Windows XP/Vista/7 compatible version for units with firmware v9.2 and above.
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Q: My CAP-DEC says "A Win32 command line email tool has stopped working."
A: This error may appear when the Java-based built in SMTP server is inaccessible. The most common cause of this is a problem with the Java installation caused by an incomplete Java update. This can happen when the user initiates a Java update and, by a quirk in the Java installer, the old Java version is removed (or corrupted) and no new version is installed.

To rectify this problem, visit this page from your unit's browser to check if Java is installed. If it is not, follow the on-screen prompts to do so.

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Q: Emails from my CAP-DEC aren't being delivered.

A: If you do not see the above error message and emails from your CAP-DEC are not being delivered, the culprit is usually one of two issues: anti-spam measures or blocked ports.

Anti-Spam Measures

The first step is to check any spam or quarantine folders associated with your email service. If you do not see your email messages here, the most common reason issue is that the email has been rejected due to a(increasingly widespread) Sender Policy Framework (SPF) in use by your email service.

If you are experiencing email delivery failures due to rejection based on SPF issues, one solution is to ensure that your CAP-DEC 1 unit (or your network with appropriately configured NAT functionality) is assigned a static, public-facing IP address and to add this IP address to the list of allowed senders for your email domain (of the CAP-DEC 1 configured administrator email address) within your SPF. However, this is often not possible due to various local network configurations, internet service provider (ISP) restrictions or other technical limitations.

A much simpler work-around (barring the above configuration of network and SPF settings) is to use an email provider with more lenient SPF constraints. A number of free email service providers are available which fit these requirements. Anecdotally, Yahoo! mail and, especially, Google Gmail seem to work well.

Blocked Ports

The default setup of the on-board Apache James Mail Server uses the default SMTP port number 25. Some internet Service Providers (ISPs) block common server ports (e.g. SMTP 25, HTTP 80). If your ISP blocks port 25, you may need to select a different port for Apache James to use. Contact your station IT staff to make this change. More information on the SMTP server configuration may be found here.

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Q: How do I configure my CAP-DEC to work with my proxy server?
A: The URLs for the FEMA IPAWS alert feed are hard-coded into the software and are not user-editable to add proxy server information. As such, proxy servers may be used by making use of the http_proxy and https_proxy environment variables on the system. (NOTE that simply changing proxy settings through the web browser settings or other locations will not suffice)

The http_proxy and/or https_proxy environment variables may be added as described here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310519 (These instructions are for Windows XP but the steps are the same once you right-click on "Computer" from the start menu). See the blog post here for more information on these environment variables.

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Q: What steps to I need to take to secure my equipment from "Zombie Invasion" messages or other unauthorized uses?
A: CLICK HERE to read the FCC statement regarding passwords and security of alerting equipment along with additional information about Gorman-Redlich CAP-DEC 1 security and "default passwords".

False messages such as "Zombie Invasions" are NOT capable of being remotely generated from a proper installation of a stand-alone Gorman-Redlich EAS-1 unit, a combination of a Gorman-Redlich CAP-DEC 1 unit and a Gorman-Redlich EAS-1 unit or the combination of a Gorman-Redlich CAP-DEC 1 unit and non-network-connected "legacy" EAS equipment from other manufacturers. In such setups, the only networked equipment is the CAP-DEC 1 unit, which is not capable of originating EAS messages (rather, it is only capable of receiving CAP formatted alert messages from the specified alert feeds and translating them into EAS messages for "legacy" alert processing). Appropriate physical security measures should be taken to prevent local operators from accessing and sending messages from EAS equipment control panels.

If you do choose to create a password for your CAP-DEC 1, you must take care to remember it. If the passwords for your CAP-DEC or EAS equipment is lost, the equipment may need to be returned to Gorman-Redlich to be reset, which may result in equipment downtime or loss of data.
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Last Updated 9/23/2013 Pages by WCS © Copyright Gorman Redlich Mfg. Co.